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  ― 67 ―

Complimentary Letters and Addresses Received By Him.

A.

60.

Council of Education Office,

Sydney.

11th September, 1877.

Sir,—

I am directed by the Council of Education to acquaint you that, in accordance with the provisions of Section 22 of the Public Schools Act, His Excellency the Governor, with the advice of the Executive Council, has appointed you to be a member of the Public School Board at Bell's Creek.

I have the honour to be, Sir,

Your most obedient servant,

GEORGE MILLER,

For Secretary.

To Mr. Quong Tart,

Public School Board,

Bell's Creek.

To Quong Tart, Esq., Bell's Creek, N.S.W.

Dear Sir,

We, the undersigned, hear with regret that you are about to leave this district, where you have resided for over twenty years, since your childhood.

We cannot allow the occasion to pass without expressing the great respect which we entertain for you, a respect which is shared by the people of the district generally, with whom, amongst all classes you have mixed in a friendly way and taken part with them in all matters of interest publicly and privately, in a manner which has reflected the highest credit upon you, and gained you a large number of personal friends, who will be sorry to lose you from amongst them.

It is a great satisfaction for them to know, however, that you are removing to another sphere in order to advance your position in life, and to one in which you will not be precluded


  ― 68 ―
from again visiting us in time to come, thus keeping alive amongst us many pleasant reminiscences of the past, in which you are intimately connected.

We remain, Dear Sir,

Yours faithfully,

W. C. FOX (Solicitor).

S. F. MACKENZIE, M.A.

ROND. HASSALL

H. P. WILSON

THOS. I. ROBERTS

J. F. FLASHMAN

J. KEEGAN (Inspector of Police).

FRANK MASON, J.P.

JOHN FRASER

ALFRED McFARLAND (District Court Judge).

W. H. JOHNSON

JAS. BRUM, J.P.

JOHN KINGSLAND

JAS. ALDCORN (P.M., Araluen).

JOHN ROGERS

JAS LARMER, J.P.

CHAS. E. DRANSFIELD

W. M. V. TARPE, J.P.

JAS. McDONALD

JOHN H. BLATCHFORD, J.P.

JOHN MUSGRAVE

THOS. STEWARD, J.P.

THOS. FORSYTH

W. F. ROBERTSON, C.P.S.

CHRIS. C. ROBINSON

THOS. ACHINTON, J.P.

Braidwood, March, 1881.

I.O.O.F.M.U., N.S. Wales.

Loyal Miners' Refuge Lodge, No. 73.

Quong Tart.

Dear Sir and Brother,

We, the undersigned Committee of the above-named Lodge, respectfully request your acceptance of this Address, in testimony of the respect and esteem in which you are held by the brothers.

You were admitted a member of our Order in 1871, and have since been a contributive member without interruption, and whenever any occasion required, have with greatest urbanity and liberality given your personal and pecuniary assistance.

Wishing you may enjoy a long, useful and successful life, we subscribe ourselves, on behalf of this Lodge,

Yours in Friendship, Love and Truth,

JOHN ELLIS. P.P.G.M.

WILLIAM DOUGLAS, P.G.

HENRY BAUMGARDNER, P.G.

MCHL. MADIGAN, P.N.G.

WM. WALSHAM, Secretary.

Presented at Public Banquet on Wednesday, 16th March, 1881, at Major's Creek.

Wm. WALSHAM,

Chairman.

Photographs following page 68: Family group



Photographs following page 68: George Henry Bruce Tart. (The infant at the time of Quong Tart's death, not included in the Group)



Photographs following page 68: Quong Tart, League of Wheelman Starter, with Mr. Bagnall



Illustration following page 68: Quong Tart - a cricketer



Photographs following page 68: Citizens' presentation salver






  ― 69 ―

We, the Undersigned,

Having been informed that Mr. Quong Tart is about to proceed to China, with a view of establishing commercial relations with mercantile firms, Hereby Testify that our knowledge of him enables us to state that during a residence of twenty years in this Colony he has, by his strict integrity, unwearied perseverance, affability and genial conduct won the esteem and respect of all classes.

There is no man of any nationality more respected in the district in which he resided.

Signed at Sydney this fourth day of April, 1881.

JOHN ROBERTSON, K.C.M.G. (”Clovelly,” Watson's Bay, late Premier).

HENRY CLARKE, M.P. (Victoria Wharf).

ALEXANDER STUART, M.P. (Sydney, of the firm of R. Evans and Co., late Treasurer).

HENRY MACREADIE (Presbyterian Minister, Sydney, the Very Reverend Moderator of Presbyterian Church).

JAMES S. FARNELL, M.P. (Sydney, New South Wales, late Premier).

JOHN MACINTOSH, J.P. (307 Pitt-street, Sydney).

EDWD. GREVILLE, J.P. (Late Member for Braidwood District).

WILLIAM MARKE, M.P. (Sydney).

R. L. MURRAY, M.P. (Sydney, New South Wales).

HENRY S. BADGERY, M.P. (Talwong, Summer Hill).

J. H. YOUNG, M.P. (Sydney, New South Wales).

WM. KELYNACK, D.D. (Ex-President Wesleyan Church, N.S.W.).

PHILLIP G. MYERS (Goulburn).

G. B. SIMPSON, J.P. (Barrister-at-Law, Sydney).

SYDNEY A. WANT (Sydney). (Solicitors, Sydney).

WM. CURTIS (Solicitor, Sydney).

J. H. WANT (Barrister-at-Law, “Clanie,” Darling Point).

SULLIVAN & SIMPSON (Stock and Station Agents, 382 George-street, Sydney).

Department of Government Asylums for the

Infirm and Destitute.

Manager's Office,

Sydney, 1st Sept., 1886.

Dear Sir,

As Manager of the Government Asylums for the Infirm and Destitute, and on behalf of the Inmates of the Liverpool and Parramatta Institutions, I desire to thank you, and


  ― 70 ―
through you all who so warmly responded to your suggestion and so kindly aided you for the great treat you afforded these poor people, and I assure that one and all most gratefully appreciate the interest shewn in them.

Amongst the 1,500 inmates under my care at Liverpool and Parramatta, there are some who have seen “better days,” and there are none who are not fully sensible of the kindness which prompted you to get up the late entertainment for them.

It has been very cheering and pleasant to hear the inmates talk of their treat, a bright day in their memories, and more than all, they are grateful for the thoughtfulness of their desolation and the efforts made to ameliorate their condition.

I am, Dear Sir,

Yours faithfully,

Frederic King,

Manager Asylums.

Mr. Quong Tart.

Dear Sir,

Having been informed that you purpose revisiting your native country, we desire that you should carry with you an expression of the estimation and respect in which you are held by those among whom you have lived.

It has been our opportunity, as representatives of the various sections of the people, to observe your life in its social, moral, and political aspects, and in each phase you have gained the warm approval of those among whom you resided. In the early days, when disputes were numerous relative to mining claims between Chinese and Europeans on the goldfields; you were generally called upon to act as sole arbitrator, and your decisions were always received by both parties as equitable.

You have acted as Interpreter in many very important cases, and your performance of the duty invariably gave satisfaction.

You depart from us bearing the esteem and goodwill of the whole community.

We venture to express the hope that your visit to China may be a means of softening recent asperities, and that you may be spared to return to our Colony, and to your wife and


  ― 71 ―
child, whose safety will be in our keeping, to renew a life of honour, health, and happiness amongst us.

Alfred Stephen,

G.C.M.G., C.B., Lieut. Governor of New South Wales.

W. C. WINDEYER (Judge of the Supreme Court of N.S.W.).

CHAS. L. GARLAND (M.L.A.).

M. H. STEPHEN (Judge of the Supreme Court of N.S.W.).

S. D. LANGLEY (Minister, Church of England, Sydney).

JOHN HAY, K.C.M.G. (President of the Legislative Council of New South Wales).

WM. KELYNACK (Minister).

GEO. H. COX (M.L.C.).

HARMAN J. TARRANT (M.R.C.S.E., Surgeon).

EDW. S. KNOX (M.L.C.).

J. CURRIE ELLES

ANDREW GARRAN, LL.D. (M.L.C.).

THOMAS E. DICKSON (Mayor of Waverley).

RICHARD HILL (M.L.C.).

JOHN MACPHERSON, J.P. (Alderman, Waverley).

JNO. M. CREED (M.L.C.).

E. P. SIMPSON, Q.C. (Attorney-General).

ARCHD. H. LACOL (M.L.C.).

SYDNEY A. WANT, Q.C. (Barrister)

SAMUEL CHARLES (M.L.C.).

BURTON BRADLEY (Solicitor).

GEO. THORNTON (M.L.C.).

STEPHEN, JAQUES, STEPHEN (Solicitors).

R. E. O'CONNOR (M.L.C.).

A. E. JAQUES (Solicitor).

JOHN MACINTOSH (M.L.C.).

EDWARD GREVILLE. J.P. (Journalist).

HENRY MOORE (M.L.C.).

GEO. ROBINSON (Journalist).

GEO. A. LLOYD (M.L.C.).

JOHN ROBERTSON (K.C.M.G.).

JOHN LACKEY (M.L.C.).

JOHN J. CALVERT (Clerk of the Parliaments).

GEO. R. DIBBS (M.L.A.).

ROBERT GUY, J.P. (Merchant).

JAMES FLETCHER (M.L.A.).

ALF. W. MEEKS (Merchant).

JOHN GALE (M.L.A.).

HENRY S. BADGERY (Merchant).

J. P. ABBOTT (M.L.A.).

EDWARD LLOYD JONES (Merchant).

A. J. RILEY (M.L.A.).

JOHN GRAHAM, J.P. (Merchant).

HUGH TAYLOR (M.L.A.).

H. FORSYTH (Merchant).

W. McMILLAN (M.L.A.).

A. L. NELSON, J.P. (Merchant).

JOHN SEE (M.L.A.).

A. C. HEWLETT, J.P. (Merchant).

E. W. O'SULLIVAN (M.L.A.).

E. JOHN FOX, J.P. (Merchant).

H. M. SLATTERY (M.L.A.).

W. BEAUMONT, J.P. (Merchant).

JULES JOUBERT (Exhibitions). Sydney, 8th November, 1888.




  ― 72 ―

Sydney, N.S.W.,

June 28/'87.

To Quong Tart, Esq.

Dear Sir,

We, the undersigned employees of the Tramway Department, and lately members of the Committee of the Fancy Fair (of which you were one of the promoters) held at the Exhibition Building, April 22nd and 23rd, in aid of the widows, orphans and sufferers left by the disastrous explosion of the Bulli Colliery, would ask your acceptance of the accompanying photograph as a memento of that occasion, and also as a slight token of the regard and esteem we have for you as a true and valued friend.

We trust that you will ever enjoy true happiness, and that prosperity may always be your lot is the very earnest and heartfelt wish of yours faithfully and sincerely,

HUBERT JESSOP

JOHN SMITH

GEORGE GAMGEE.

JOHN HOLLINGWORTH.

WM. NOYCE

CHARLES SANTER

JAMES T. ENTWISTLE.

28—6—‘87.

Colonial Secretary's Office,

Sydney, 7th November, 1888.

This will introduce to you Mr. Quong Tart, a Chinese merchant of this city. Mr. Quong Tart has been a resident in this Colony for many years, and was instrumental in suppressing in a large degree the opium traffic amongst his countrymen in the Australian Colonies. He is a person generally respected and esteemed by all classes. He proceeds to Hong Kong on a pleasure trip, and I should be glad if any attention or assistance can be rendered to him during his travels.

HENRY PARKES,

Colonial Secretary.

Sydney,

7th November, 1888.

To Quong Tart, Esq.

Dear Sir,—

As you are about to leave us for a few months, on a visit to China, we, your employees in the office, tea rooms,


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&c., &c., desire to take the opportunity of expressing our very great thankfulness for all your many kindnesses to us, for the deep interest you have always taken in our welfare, and your constant concern for our comfort.

We sincerely hope that you may have a safe and pleasant voyage to your native land, find all your relations well, receive a warm and hearty welcome from your countrymen, whom you have done so much for, that your visit may in every way be satisfactory, and that you may be brought back again safely to your dear ones here.

Wishing long life and happiness to Mrs. Tart, your dear daughter, and self, and hoping that you will accept this address as a humble testimony to our esteem and affection.

We are, Sir,

Yours sincerely,

JOHANNA STALKER

ANNIE TUCKER

ELLEN GOLDSTONE

C. A. LOOK

M. A. FRASER

THOMAS KEIR

MAY FORD

M. M. PRIESTLEY

CHARLES G. HOBBES

LIZZIE GLANVILLE

OLIVE YATES

M. JESSEP

MARTHA FROST

E. BROADLEY

M. MATHIESON

W. WATSFORD

L. BUSH

ERNEST E. FOUNTAIN

Lewington House,

Milson's Point, St. Leonards,

3rd November, 1888.

Quong Tart, Esq.

My Dear Sir,

I send you a testimonial, which you may shew to Missionaries and others in the cities of China which you may visit. You will especially find Presbyterian Missionaries from America in Canton, and from England and Scotland in Amoy and Swatow.

I hope your visit may prove useful to the Chinese, and beneficial to yourself.

Owing to my visit to Melbourne, I am unable to take any part in the public expression of esteem, but I am happy to send


  ― 74 ―
this written expression of my regard for you personally, and my confidence in all your benevolent efforts.

I am,

Yours sincerely,

ROBERT STEELE.

COPY OF TESTIMONIAL.

To Presbyterian Missionaries and Others in China.

This is to certify that I have known the bearer, Mr. Quong Tart, a Chinese Merchant in the City of Sydney, New South Wales, for a number of years, and have pleasure in stating that he has maintained a good reputation as a citizen, a merchant and a philanthropist; that he has been distinguished for his charitable works among the poor and his hospitality to all engaged in good work; that he has taken an intelligent and sympathetic interest in the conditions of the Chinese in Australia, by earnest efforts to get the sale of opium to them prohibited by law, in which he has been supported by many; that he has done much to promote pacific relations between Europeans and Chinese, and during recent agitations proved very useful; that he now visits China with a view to allay irritation among the Chinese, and to explain how matters stand in relation to the Chinese in these Colonies; that he has shown a sympathy with Christian work; and finally, that he is commended to the confidence of Missionaries and others whom he may meet in China.

ROBERT STEELE, D.D.,

Minister of St. Stephen's Presbyterian Church.

Sydney, New South Wales,

3rd November, 1888.

LETTER OF INTRODUCTION.

Newington College,

Stanmore,

November 6th, 1888.

To the Superintendent,

Wesleyan Mission,

Canton.

My Dear Brother,

I send this letter to introduce to you Mr. Quong Tart, a Chinese gentleman who has been for many years a resident in the Colony of New South Wales. During several years he


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has been carrying on the business of a tea merchant in Sydney, where he has won the highest esteem of all who have the pleasure of his acquaintance.

His manliness and integrity, his keen interest in social questions, notably among which I might name the labour he has put forth in seeking to abate the evils of opium-smoking, and the hearty good-will with which he has sought to brighten the lot of both old and young who are inmates of State Asylums, his active and untiring zeal to forward the best interests of his fellow-countrymen during a time of agitation and excitement, these are qualities which have deservedly secured him the esteem of all classes.

I have known him as a friend for a long time, and he has been a frequent visitor to my house and family. It is with much pleasure that I write this note introducing Mr. Tart to your notice. I may add that in thus writing I give expression not only to my own sentiments, but also to the sentiments of many others both among our ministers and people.

Wishing you much success in your great work,

I am,

Yours in fraternal regards,

WM. KELYNACK,

President of Newington College.

Ex-President of N.S.W. Annual Conference.

Centenary Hall,

Sydney,

May 22nd, 1890.

Quong Tart, Esq.

Dear Sir,

I have very much pleasure in conveying to you the cordial thanks of the Wesleyan General Conference, which was expressed by a formal resolution, for your kind hospitality, and the opportunity afforded the Conference for a pleasant gathering at your rooms on the evening of Tuesday, May 20th.

I have the honour to be,

Yours sincerely,

H. T. BURGESS,

Secretary of the Conference.




  ― 76 ―

Colonial Secretary's Office,

Sydney,

20th August, 1891.

Sir,

I am directed by the Colonial Secretary to inform you that His Excellency the Governor, with the advice of the Executive Council, has been pleased to appoint you, in conjunction with the other gentlemen as named below, to be a member of a Royal Commission to make a diligent and full inquiry with the view of ascertaining the undoubted facts in the matter of alleged illicit gambling and immoralities among the Chinese resident in George Street North in the City of Sydney and neighbourhood, and the alleged bribery or misconduct of any members of the Police Force in relation thereto; also to make visits of inspection to localities in the said City and Suburbs occupied by Chinese, and investigate and report upon social conditions, means of sanitary provision in the dwellings and workshops, the callings or occupations and other circumstances affecting the well-being of such persons.

2. The Commission, which bears this day's date, has, I am desired to add, been forwarded to the President.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient servant,

CRITCHETT WALKER,

Principal Under-Secretary.

Quong Tart, Esq.,

King Street,

Sydney.

The Right Worshipful,

William Patrick Manning, Esq., J.P.,

Mayor of Sydney,

President,

Francis Abigail, Esq., J.P.

John Stuart Hawthorne, Esq.,

and

Ramsay McKillop, Esq.




  ― 77 ―

Oddfellows' Offices,

M.U. Hall,

Elizabeth Street,

Sydney,

25th April, 1892.

Dear Sir and Brother,

The Officers of the above Order desire to convey to you, on behalf of the Manchester Unity in New South Wales, their best thanks for the kind, generous and brotherly manner in which you entertained the Officers and Deputies attending the Grand Annual Committee of 1892.

I am,

Yours faithfully,

EDWIN SCHOFIELD,

Grand Sec.

Brother Quong Tart,

King Street,

Sydney.

To QUONG TART, Esq.

Sydney, 17th April, 1894.

Dear Sir,

On the occasion of your leaving Sydney for a short visit to China, we, the undersigned, representing the Church of England Chinese Mission in this city, desire to express our regard and esteem for you as a citizen, and our appreciation of your unvarying interest in the moral and spiritual good of your fellow-countrymen.

We gratefully acknowledge our indebtedness to you for much counsel and advice in connection with the Mission, especially in its early history; and we believe that you rejoice with us over its growth and development.

We trust that with God's blessing, the new Chinese Church, respecting which you have shown such a deep interest, may ere long be commenced, and that on your return to Sydney you may see it completed.

Your unceasing labour, often almost single-handed, to put a stop to the indiscriminate sale of opium in this colony is now being taken up by a large and representative committee of the citizens, and we feel sure that it will in due season be crowned with success.




  ― 78 ―

Wishing you, Mrs. Quong Tart, and your family a pleasant and prosperous journey, and a safe return to the Colony,

We are, your sincere friends,

WILLIAM M. COWPER,

Administrator of the Diocese of Sydney in the absence of the Lord Bishop.

S. D. LANGLEY,

Superintendent, Chinese Mission.

W. A. CHARLTON,

Hon. Sec., Sydney Chinese Mission.

E. P. FIELD,

67 Elizabeth Street.

GEORGE SOO HOO TEN.

JAMES WING.

TIMOTHY JOY CHEW.

PETER SHOO.

To Quong Tart, Esq., of Sydney

Dear Sir,—

As you are about to depart on a prolonged visit to China, we desire, on behalf of the whole of your employees, to give expression to the feelings of high esteem which we bear towards you.

Many of us have been in your employment for a number of years, and we gladly acknowledge your constant interest in our welfare, your uniform kindness, and your frequent acts of generosity towards us.

Sincerely and with respect do we say that we have found in you not only an employer, but also a friend; and the friendly feelings that have at all times existed have caused us to feel a pleasure in the performance of all our duties.

We congratulate you on the high position of respect and influence to which you have attained both in Sydney and throughout New South Wales, and we, who by our daily duties are brought into such close relationship to you, say, with all our hearts, that the praise and honour which have been so abundantly conferred upon you by the press and by prominent public men have been richly deserved.




  ― 79 ―

We feel confident that you need no assurance from us that we will be loyal to your interests in your absence.

It is our earnest wish that Mrs. Tart, yourself, and family may have a pleasant voyage, an enjoyable holiday, and a safe return. We wish you farewell, and bid you God-speed.

We remain, Dear Sir,

Yours respectfully,

ALFRED B. HOOPER,

General Manager, on behalf of Male Employees.

M. G. REDFORD,

Manageress, on behalf of Female Employees.

W. H. FARR,

On behalf of Kitchen Staff.

20th April, 1894.

To WHOM IT MAY CONCERN.

This will serve to introduce Mr. Quong Tart, of this City—a Chinese merchant in extensive business.

During the many years of my official life as Head of successive Administrations, I have had many opportunities of observing Mr. Tart's conduct which has been uniformly such as to secure to him the respect of his fellow citizens. He has established a character for energy and integrity, and has at all times largely and liberally joined in the charities of the community.

Mr. Quong Tart is married to an English lady, and has a small family.

HENRY PARKES.

Sydney,

New South Wales,

March 1st, 1894.

LETTER OF INTRODUCTION.

Government House,

Sydney,

April 13th, 1894.

Dear Sir,

Mr. Quong Tart, a naturalised citizen of this Colony, is about to visit his native country for the purpose of facilitating commercial relations between Sydney and the principal Chinese Ports.




  ― 80 ―

Apart from the estimation Mr. Quong Tart is held in by the commercial world, he is highly and justly esteemed here for the energetic manner in which he has supported all philanthropic movements. I shall be grateful for any assistance you may be able to afford him.

I have the honour to be,

Yours faithfully,

R. W. DUFF.

To His Excellency,

Sir W. Robinson, K.C.M.G.,

Hong Kong.

New South Wales,

Chief Secretary's Office,

Sydney,

18th April, 1894.

This will introduce Mr. Quong Tart, Mandarin of the Chinese Empire, and a naturalised citizen of this colony.

Mr. Tart has been resident in New South Wales now for very many years, and is held in the highest esteem by all classes of the community.

He is proceeding to China for business purposes, and any attention or information that may be afforded him will be regarded as a favour by this Government.

GEORGE R. DIBBS,

Chief Secretary of New South Wales.

Lodge of Tranquility, No. 42,

United Grand Lodge of N.S.W.,

Sydney, N.S.W.,

18th April, 1894.

Dear Brother Quong Tart,

On your departure for China, we feel that we cannot let you go without expressing to you our hearty good wishes for a pleasant voyage and a safe return; your career amongst us, not only as a Mason, but as a good citizen, has won and maintained our esteem, and especially do we value your noble efforts in the various philanthropic movements in which you have actively engaged yourself.




  ― 81 ―

Commending you to the brethren in China, praying that the G. A. O. T. U. may pour down His blessing upon you, and wishing you and Mrs. Tart and the children health and happiness,

We are,

Yours fraternally,

J. D. WARD, W.M.

T. AYERS, J.W.

J. HERMAN, S.W.

LEWIS SAMUELS, S.W.

Railways, New South Wales,

Ashfield,

20th April, 1894.

Quong Tart, Esq.,

Sydney.

Dear Sir,

On the eve of your departure for China, we, on behalf of ourselves and many other prominent officers and employees of the New South Wales Railways, beg to convey to you our respect and esteem in return for the valuable aid and kindness rendered to us at all times, and wish you, your good wife and family a safe and most pleasant voyage and speedy return.

We, with great respect and kind regards, beg to subscribe ourselves,

Yours very faithfully,

MOSS BROWNE, Station Master.

E. R. WILLIAMS, R. Station Master.

WILLIAM FINLAY, Chief Booking Clerk.

WILLIAM MONTGOMERY, Employee, G.R.

JAMES C. LEWIS, Employee

SIDNEY HULL, Goods Clerk.

ROBERT HENLEY, Employee.

J. HOOPER, Clerk.

W. WHITE, Guard, N.S.W.

M. A. L. de PLATER, Signalman

H. LAMBERT, Guard.

G. P. DAVIES, Porter.

GEORGE COURTMAN, Shunter.

JOSEPH HARRISON, Guard.

GEORGE PICKLES, Fettler.

ROBERT DEWS, Ganger.

LAWRENCE McSULLEA, Guard.

JOHN REILLY, Guard.

PETER P. MONJON, Ticket Collector.

W. CLISSOLD, Guard.

A. G. LEE, Guard, N.S.W.R.

G. MINTO, Guard.

JAMES GALATHORP, Guard, N.S.W.R.

J. BLINKINSOPP, Employee, N.S.W.R.

RICHARD COX, Guard.




  ― 82 ―

Extract from “Sydney Daily Telegraph,” 28th January, 1896:–

“Accident to Mr. Quong Tart.—Mr. Quong Tart met with an accident at his residence, Ashfield, yesterday morning. Mr. Tart was descending the stairs with a child on his shoulder, and in attempting to save the child, which had over-balanced itself, Mr. Tart missed his footing and fell to the bottom of the stairs. Dr. Collingwood was at once sent for. It was found that Mr. Tart had fractured one of his ribs.”

Through the accident, Quong Tart was absent from Sydney for a couple of weeks, during which time he received many letters of sympathy—a copy of one reads:–

Ashfield G.R.

Memorandum to—

Quong Tart, Esq.,

“Gallop House,”

Ashfield.

Dear Sir,

It may be pleasing to you to know amongst your innumerable friends in the Colony, there are the railway folk, who are deeply interested in your present misfortune, particularly so, nearly, if not all, the guards and employees on the Suburban Line, but especially those at the “Ashfield Station,” who wish to convey to you their deepest sympathy, and trust you may soon be able to get about and better than ever. With every respect to your esteemed self, Mrs. Tart and family, trusting that you may be spared for many years yet to come,

Yours very faithfully,

E. R. WILLIAMS.

WM. KEATING.

M. S. BROWNE, S.M.

M. DE PLATER.

WM. FINLAY.

WM. BOYLE.

G. COURTMAN.

A. BUMFORD.

A. DUCKETT.

ADAM PLATT.

F. RIMM.

JNO. HOOPER.

JAS. S. WHITE.

J. D. EDMONDS.

JOHN WILSON.

On behalf of all the other staff, etc.,

Secretaries' Office,

84 Elizabeth St., Sydney,

3rd November, 1902.

Quong Tart, Esq.,

George Street.

Dear Sir,

On behalf of the Committee of the Orphans' Fair, we have to tender to you their thanks for the great kindness you


  ― 83 ―
showed us in organising the now memorable Chinese “Tug of War” at the Town Hall during the Fair. All those who saw the spectacle warmly praised it. We may safely say that it was one of the great draws of the Bazaar.

Again thanking you for your kindness.

Yours faithfully,

HENRY G. QUIGLAN

C. G. HEPBURN

Hon. Secs.,

His lady sympathisers were very numerous. The following lines were received at the time from the Lady Superintendent of Flower Missions:–

World's Women's Christian Temperance Union.

Flower Missions Department

Newtown, New South Wales, Australia.

Cheer up, old friend! The heat is trying,
And broken ribs are trying, too;
But a broken heart is worse than either,
And this can ne'er be felt by you.

Your wife is worth her weight in diamonds,
Your children dear as dear can be;
Your friends are counted by the million,
And send their love to poor Q. T.

And hope that he may soon be better,
And take his place in town again;
As nimble and as bright as ever,
Without a care or twinge or pain.

So do not fret and make it longer,
Before your kindly face we see,
Whene'er we call at the rooms in King Street
To get a scone and a cup of tea.

But just be patient, do not worry,
But be as good as good can be;
And you'll get well in half a jiffy;
Just try it, like our good Q. T.

Please give my love to your good lady
(I hope she will not jealous be),
And for yourself take a very large portion
From yours mostly truly—

A. J P

January 28th, 1896.

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