previous
next



  ― v ―

Preface

THIS pamphlet is issued to supply farmers, tanners, merchants, and others with authentic information in regard to the value of wattles. The demand for good wattle-bark becomes greater every year, while the supply does not cope with it. The cultivation of wattles is not a theoretical matter; it is easy, remunerative, and has already entered the domain of practical farming. Australia is the native country of wattles; they grow in the poorest soil, and require only a moderate rainfall. Their cultivation is strongly recommended to farmers who have a patch of poor soil which they cannot otherwise profitably utilize. The return is in about five to seven years, and attention to the wattle plantation can be chiefly given in the spare hours which are available on every farm. Farmers in some districts could be recommended to put as much land as possible under wattle, provided they had the means to wait. At present only the following wattles are recommended to be planted:—

The South Australian Broad-leaved Wattle, Acacia pycnantha.

The Sydney Black Wattle, Acacia decurrens.

The Tasmanian and Victorian Black Wattle, Acacia mollissima.

At the same time, reference to the detailed information given in regard to other wattles will show that many of them are worthy of conservation if farmers have them on their land, and further experience may show that some are even worthy of local cultivation. The three wattles specially mentioned, however, with their extended geographical range and proved value, are sufficient for all practical purposes at present.

I desire to express my obligations to my assistant, Mr. R. T. Baker, and to Mr. H. G. Smith, also of the Museum Staff, for valuable help.

previous
next