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Account of the different kinds of Timber in Port Jackson

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[Inserted into journal between pages 232-233]

Account of the different kinds of Timber & the use it is fit for; in Port Jackson

No.1. Gum Tree, the Gum very dark; the Wood white fit for little but the fire, but very good for that.

2: Iron Wood, No Gum in it, grows very tall & large all about; but near Rose Hill in particular, fit for large Beams, Girders, &c. a very good Timber for such large uses tho' very hard to cut & to work.

3. Corkwood, called so because the bark is like Cork, grows near the Sea side, just within the Harbour, none in land, not even so far as Sydney, it is a very good Timber tho' very scarce, No Gum in it, the largest that has been seen was about 2 feet diameter, fit for almost any purpose; but for Boats & for light boarding in particular, such as doors &c.

 4. The Peppermint Tree, so called because the leaves taste strongly like peppermint & give an Oil, much like the Oil of Peppermint; would make very good & handsome furniture, but has not been at all used by us in Buildings, because it does not run sufficiently long before it branches, there is some gum in it.

5. The Tea Tree, so called because a little of the leaves being put into the Native Tea gives it a pleasant spicey taste; works very easy & smooth, more fit for furniture than any thing else, they are mostly unsound, tho' no Gum in them.

6. The Swamp Mahogany, grows in, or close to swamps some of it turns out very good Timber & perhaps all would if not very Old, fit for furniture, or framing, such as doors &c. the largest to be sound is about 18 inches diameter, No Gum in it to damage it at all.

7. The High Ground Mahogany, grows on higher ground, is best wood for furniture of any in the Country; it runs to about 2 1/2 feet diameter & sound, fit for doors, wainscots, door frames &c.

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[Inserted into journal between pages 232-233]

8. Brown Bark'd Gum Tree, exceeding good Timber for large uses, grows in the Kanguroo Ground & about Rose Hill, to the height of 80 to 100 feet without a branch, some have been cut which were 9 or 10 inches diameter at about 80 feet from the base & quite sound, if is fit for very large beams &c. boards for flooring, door frames & for every use in common: No Gum to hurt in it.

9. Blue Bark'd Gum Tree, but little different from that last mentioned & nothing inferior in respect to size or use.

10. Turpentine Tree, so called because a very small quantity of a kind of Turpentine is found between the bark & the Timber & the largest from 3 to 4 feet in diameter at the base, fit for any kind of building uses, board, flooring &c. No Gum in it.  

11. Pine Tree, so called for no other reason than that the leaves nearly resemble those of the Pine Tree, very good framing Timber, also for laths, shingles, flooring &c. No Gum in it.

12. Honeysuckle Tree, called so because it bears a flower which contains a great quantity of Honey grown in Sandy & rocky ground has been used particularly for Staves & felloes of wheels, Wheelbarrows & some boards &c. does not often grow to more than 10 to 12 feet high & from one to two feet diameter, very crooked, no Gum in it.

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