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§ 134. “Absence of the Speaker.”

“Formerly no provision was made for supplying the place of the Speaker by a deputy Speaker pro tempore, as in the Upper House, and, when he was unavoidably absent, no business could be done, but the Clerk acquainted the House with the cause of his absence, and put the question for adjournment. When the Speaker by illness was unable to attend for a considerable time, it was necessary to elect another Speaker, with the usual formalities of the permission of the Crown, and the royal approval. On the recovery of the Speaker, the latter would resign, or ‘fall sick,’ and the former was re-elected, with a repetition of the same ceremonies. In 1855, on the report of a select committee, standing order No. 83 was agreed to, which enabled the chairman of ways and means, as deputy Speaker, to take the chair during the unavoidable absence of the Speaker, and perform his duties. The provisions of this standing order received statutory authority by Act 18 and 19 Vic. c. 84.” (May's Parl. Prac. 10th ed. p. 191.)




  ― 481 ―

Resignation of member.

37. A member may by writing addressed to the Speaker, or to the Governor-General if there is no Speaker or if the Speaker is absent from the Commonwealth, resign his place135, which thereupon shall become vacant.

HISTORICAL NOTE.—In the Commonwealth Bill, 1891, the clause was in substantially the same form. At the Adelaide session, 1897, it was introduced and passed exactly as it stands.

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