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§ 434. “The Members of the Inter-State Commission.”

No provision is made by the Constitution as to the number of the members of the Inter-State Commission, or as to their qualification. The (Imperial) Interpretation Act, 1889 (52 and 53 Vic. c. 63, sec. 1) provides that in all Acts of the Imperial Parliament, unless the contrary intention appears, words in the plural shall include the singular. The words “the members of the Inter-State Commission” would seem clearly to express a very definite intention that there must be more Commissioners than one; a single Commissioner would not be a “member” of a Commission; not—according to Webster's definition—could he be a “Commission.” A Commission is “a company of persons joined in the performance of some duty or the execution of some trust; as, the Inter-State Commerce Commission.” (Webster's Internat. Dict.) The Parliament, in the exercise of its general powers and its duty of establishing the Commission, will be able to fix the number of members, and, if thought fit, to prescribe a qualification.

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