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Alteration of limits of States.

123. The Parliament of the Commonwealth may, with the consent of the Parliament of a State, and the approval of the majority of the electors of the State voting upon the question, increase, diminish, or otherwise alter474 the limits of the State, upon such terms and conditions as may be agreed on, and may, with the like consent, make provision respecting the effect and operation of any increase or diminution or alteration of territory in relation to any State affected.

HISTORICAL NOTE.—Clause 4, Chap. VI. of the Commonwealth Bill of 1891 was as follows:—

“The Parliament of the Commonwealth may, from time to time, with the consent of the Parliament of a State, increase, diminish, or otherwise alter the limits of a State, upon such terms and conditions as may be agreed to, and may, with the like consent, make provision respecting the effect and operation of any such increase or diminution or alteration of territory in relation to any State affected by it.”

At the Adelaide session, 1897, the clause was adopted in substantially the same words. At the Melbourne session, it was verbally altered after the fourth report.

After the failure of the Convention Bill to poll the statutory number of votes in New South Wales, both Houses of the Parliament of that colony recommended (inter alia) “that better provision should be made against the alteration of the boundaries of a State without its own consent—namely, by the protection afforded by clause 127 [sec. 128] as to the representation of States.” Accordingly at the Premiers' Conference, 1899, it was agreed to amend the clause by inserting “and the approval of the majority of the electors of the State voting upon the question.”




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