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Qualifications of Electors and Members of the Senate and House of Representatives

The Constitution assimilates these qualifications (sections 8, 16). Some of the qualifications are dealt with in the Constitution under the head of “the House of Representatives,” others under “Both Houses of the Parliament.”

In regard to the qualification of electors and members alike, it is a striking feature of the Constitution that it gives power to the Commonwealth over each; and this power was accorded in recognition of the fact that it was impossible to regard such matters as purely of state concern. The qualifications of electors and members therefore may be prescribed by the Parliament; and the provisions of sections 30 and 34 are only until provision is made by the Parliament. The power of the Parliament is, however, limited by conditions, of which the first is that the qualification for members and electors is the same for the Senate as the


  ― 106 ―
House; while as to electors, the provisions of sections 8, 30, and 41 are designed to secure the “democratic” principle that the suffrage shall be of the widest, and that no person shall have more than one vote.

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