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The Capital, and Social Relations with Sydney.

The Capital of the Federation will be a centre of social and fashionable activities, as Washington has proved to the United States. In Bathurst or its neighbourhood there are already in existence all the agencies of complete civilised life. These would expand naturally and gradually to the needs of the life of a Federal Capital. The legislature, from its introductory sitting, would not be meeting in a crudely organised town, but in a city where it could be accommodated with ease and dignity, and would not have to spend the years it is waiting for the erection of the Capital in paltry surroundings, such as was the fate of the early Congress meeting in Washington. The Judiciary and the department of administration could also be accommodated during the same intermediate period; and fitting housing for the Governor-General could also be readily obtained. More than one of the many noble mansions in the vicinity of Bathurst would be at the disposal of that high officer. Now the relation of these facts to the social life of Sydney is easily seen. There would be no breach of continuity or identity between the social arrangements which now so contribute to the business prosperity of Sydney and to its prominence as a centre of “light and leading.” while on the southward at Bombala and Albury the whole character of the society of the Capital would have interests and sympathies remote from Sydney, if not antagonistic to it. Again, Bathurst is on the direct line of route for the thousands of visitors who annually visit Sydney to make a stay in the Blue Mountain townships, and the trip to the Jenolan Caves. These would almost all pass on to the Federal City as a mere matter of curiosity, and pleasure seeking, and Sydney Harbour, the Blue Mountains, and the Capital would be insensibly grouped together as identical in scenic interest. On the other hand, visitors from the southern provinces to the Capital, were it to the southward, would require to be under special inducement to visit the Harbour, the Mountains, or the Caves. Their visit would probably terminate at the Capital, and Sydney and the mountain region would be deprived of that advertisement and that substantial gain, which would accrue were the Capital at the Western City or in its vicinity.

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