previous
next



  ― xv ―
view facsimile

CONTENTS OF THE FIRST VOLUME.

           
CHAPTER I.  PAGE 
THE SETTLER'S JOURNAL 
CHAPTER II. 
Mr, William Thornley, a sort of Half-Farmer in the County of Surrey, finding that he cannot live on his small Capital, turns his thoughts to the Colonies—Reasons for Emigration—A Wife's hearty consent an indispensable Preliminary—Preparations—Voyage to Van Diemen's Land—Appearance of the Country—He has an interview with the Governor—Mode of obtaining a grant of Land 
CHAPTER III. 
Resolves to lose no time in getting out of the Town and on to his Farm—His Journey up the Country in search of good Land—His Talk with an old Hand—He meets with a strange Person and makes a new Acquaintance—Mode of Farming in the Colony—An Adventure  25 



  ― xvi ―
view facsimile

                       
CHAPTER IV.  PAGE 
How to milk a wild Cow—Picture of a Settler's Dwelling—Mutton-chops and Dampers—A spare Bed “improvisatised”—Night Alarm—Sheep-stealing  49 
CHAPTER V. 
Pursuit of the Sheep-stealers—Meeting with the Natives—The black Man's instinct in Tracking—Walk over the Country—Finds Land to please him—Returns to Hobart-Town with his new Acquaintance, Crab—Proceeds with his Family to the Clyde  73 
CHAPTER VI. 
Journey up the Country with Family, Bullock-carts, and Crab—A steep Hill—A Night inthe Bush—Arrives at his Land—His first chop at a Gum-tree  94  
CHAPTER VII. 
A Settler's daily Labours—Chopping down Gum-trees tough work—Builds a Log-house—Buys some Sheep—Shoots a wild Animal—Black-cockatoo Pie—A Kangaroo Steamer  116 
CHAPTER VIII. 
AKangaroo Hunt—Description and Habits of the Animal—Crab dilates on the Topsy-turviness of all things Animal, Vegetable, and Geographical in Van Diemen's Land  136 
CHAPTER IX. 
Takes Possession of his new House—Delight of Independence—Crab puts the Plough into the Ground—The Garden and Sheep-shearing—The Settler takes Stock and makes a Discovery  149 



  ― xvii ―
view facsimile

                   
CHAPTER X.  PAGE 
Expenses of Settling—Increase of Sheep and Cattle—Anecdotes of Snakes—His Position in 1821—Increase of Sheep and Cattle in 1824—Sheep-stealing increases in the Colony—Hears some disagreeable accounts of Bushrangers—His Prosperous State in May, 1824—His Tranquillity is suddenly disturbed by distressing cries of Alarm from a neighbouring Farm  162 
CHAPTER XI. 
Hastens with a party of Friends to his Neighbour's assistance—The dangerous passing of the River on the Trunk of a Tree—The lifeless Body of a young Girl strangely discovered—The plundered Dwelling, and the desolate Mother  189 
CHAPTER XII. 
The Attack of the Bushrangers—The mysterious Fate of the lost Husband—It is resolved to pursue the Bushrangers—Preparations for the Expedition—The Magistrate heads the Party—Horrible discovery  216 
CHAPTER XIII. 
The Ruins of the burnt Stock-keeper's Hut—The Murderer Musqueeto and the Natives—The Sagacity of the Kangaroo-Dogs—Native's Tomb—The Natives begin an Attack—Skirmish with the Bushrangers  229 
CHAPTER XIV. 
The Bushrangers Retreat—The Magistrate's Party pursue—A Bivouac—Tracks of the Bushrangers—Crossing of the Big River—The Pursuit grows warm  246 



  ― xviii ―
view facsimile

       
CHAPTER XV.  PAGE 
Arrival at the Great Lake—Bushrangers at Bay—The Fight—Simultaneous Attack of the Natives—Matters remain in suspense—Thornley looks out for a Kangaroo for Supper  263 
CHAPTER XVI. 
Hector points at unexpected Game—Thornley meets with a party of Soldiers—His Joy thereat—His Disappointment thereon—His lamentable Predicament—His fortunate Escape from a Pistol-bullet—His Release—A Letter from his Wife—The Bushrangers escape to an Island in the Lake—Melancholy News from the Clyde—Thornley resolves to return Home  283 

previous
next