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CONTENTS.

                                                     
CHRONOLOGICAL TABLE OF MAIN EVENTS  ..  p.xiii. 
INTRODUCTION--  .. 
..  Economic Development of Australia since 1890.  pp.xix.--xxxii. 
CHAPTER I.-- ORIGIN AND GENERAL STRUCTURE OF THE POLITICAL LABOUR MOVEMENT. 
..  Defeat of the Maritime Strike showed impotence of workers when the State machine was at the service of the masters -- Hence Labour Parties formed to control that machine -- Their policy to be determined by Movement as a whole -- Labour to be a third party -- To get concessions the Party must vote solidly, and its members follow decisions of Caucus -- Disunity of first parties warranted intervention of Conference.  pp.1--12 
CHAPTER II.-- THE THEORY AND PRACTICE OF CAUCUS CONTROL. 
..  Labour Member responsible not to constituents onnly, but to Movement as a whole -- Caucus determines details of tactics -- Ministers elected by Caucus -- Inadequacy of Caucus system to control Labour Ministries.  pp.13--21 
CHAPTER III.-- THE CONTROL OF THE POLITICIANS BY THE MOVEMENT. 
..  Representation on Conference a compensation to local labourites for loss of direct control over representative--It frames the policy and controls its execution by Labour Members -- Resistance of the latter -- Revolt of Kidston -- N.S.W. Labour Government long ignores its Platform and Conference -- Eventually obliged by Conference to offer to resign -- The Conscription split -- The expelled Ministers join with Labour's enemies -- Constitutional question thus raised.  pp.22-53 
CHAPTER IV.-- THE POSITION OF THE INDUSTRIALISTS IN THE POLITICAL LABOUR MOVEMENT. 
..  The Labour Parties, though founded by and for trades unionists, admitted other classes to membership -- Contests between the sections -- Failure of Labour Governments to pass industrial legislation leads to the secret organisation of an “industrial section”, which captures and controls Conference -- The section becomes a machine for securing seats for unionists -- Corrupt practices veiled by championship of industrialism.  PP.54-72 
CHAPTER V.-- HETEROGENEITY OF THE ELEMENTS WITHIN THE LABOUR PARTY. 
..  To secure political power the Labour Party courts the support of middle-class democrats and Australian nationalists, small farmers, prospectors and shopkeepers, the Roman Catholic Church and the Liquor Trade -- Why this was possible -- Evidence for secret alliances with Liquor and other sectional capitalist interests  pp.73--86 
CHAPTER VI.-- THE INDUSTRIAL LABOUR MOVEMENT. 
..  Foundations of Unionism in Australia -- Special problems to be worked out -- Organisation of bush workers -- Types of Unionism -- Need for co-ordination  pp.87--98 
CHAPTER VII.-- THE CO-ORDINATION OF UNION FORCES BY FEDERATIONS. 
..  Labour Councils -- Their powers and organisation, their inadequacy -- Plans for an Australian Labour Federation -- Its early successes and ultimate collapse -- Complete failure to co-ordinate the forces of Unionism between the several States -- The plan of 1913 rejected as a scheme to control the industrial wing in the interests of the political  pp.99--113 
CHAPTER VIII.-- THE GROWTH OF THE REACTION AGAINST POLITICALISM. 
..  Unionists wearied by the slowness of parliamentary methods to yield positive results, and then by the treachery of Labour Ministers, begin to look to direct action for speedier remedies -- Influence of American ideas -- Effects of organising the nomad bush workers -- The great Coal Strike of 1909 and the Coercion Act  pp.114--124 
CHAPTER IX.-- THE AMALGAMATION MOVEMENT. 
..  The formation of a composite union in Queensland dictated by empiral considerations -- The success of this experiment and spread of American ideas inspires the theory of one all-embracing union instead of a federation -- At the same time the A.L.F. fails in the General Strike of 1912 -- The expansion of the A.W.U.  pp.125--146 
CHAPTER X.-- THE WORK OF THE I.W.W. IN AUSTRALIA. 
..  Foundation of the I.W.W. in Australia -- Contrast between economic conditions in Australia and America -- Propaganda methods of I.W.W. new to Australia -- Criticisms of political action and arbitration -- Positive philosophy of I.W.W. -- Forgery and incendiarism as weapons in the class war -- The leaders imprisoned and the I.W.W. declared an unlawful association  pp.147--172 
CHAPTER XI.-- THE ONE BIG UNION. 
..  The I.W.W. originate new movement for closer unionism on industrial lines -- The value of such organisation illustrated by the Coal Strike of 1916, and the urgent need for it driven home by the General Strike of 1917 -- Decisions of Trade Union Congresses for an O.B.U. on Trautmann's plan and with a revolutionary preamble  pp.173--194 
CHAPTER XII.-- THE O.B.U. AND THE A.W.U. 
..  The A.W.U. leaders opposed the O.B.U. as a threat to their positions and to their prospects of political advancement -- The O.B.U. regarded the A.W.U. as structurally unscientific, as reactionary in policy, and as controlled by opportunists and boodlers -- Examination of these contentions -- The character of workers' organisations in Australia summed up  pp.195--210 

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