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  ― 230 ―

Sweet Tea Plant

SMILAX? GLYCIPHYLLA

This is a tree or shrub whose leaves only we have seen, but from them we judge it to belong to the genus Smilax. For want of the stem we cannot settle its specific character. These leaves are about two inches long, ovato-lanceolate, pointed, entire, marked with three longitudinal ribs, and many transverse elevated veins, smooth and shining above, glaucous beneath, with a thick cartilaginous edge of the substance of the ribs. The leaves have the taste of liquorice root accompanied with bitter. They are said to make a kind of tea, not unpleasant to the taste, and good for the scurvy. The plant promises much in the last respect, from its bitter as a tonic, as well as the quantity of saccharine matter it contains.

Leaves of this plant are represented on the same plate with the Tea Tree. A. is the front, B. the back of a leaf.

Colour plate facing page 230 of 'The Tea-Tree of New South Wales'



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