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  ― 277 ―

White-Jointed Spider

The species of Spiders, unless seen recent, and in the utmost state of perfection, are not easily distinguished. The present species is most remarkable for the lucid surface of its thorax and legs, which latter are furnished with several long moveable spines, that may be either elevated or depressed at the will of the animal: this, however, is not peculiar to the present species, but is seen in some others. The eyes are eight in number, and are arranged in the same manner as those of the great American Spider, or Aranea Avicularia of Linnæus. The colour of this Spider is a clear chestnut brown, except the body, which is a pale brown, with a very deep or blackish fascia on its upper part, reaching about half-way down. The orifice at the tip of each fang is very visible by so slight a magnifying power as that of a glass of two inches focus: this Spider is therefore of the number of those which poison their prey before they destroy it.

The Plate exhibits the back and front view, of the natural size. A. the order in which the spines are placed. The lesser a. two spines enlarged, shewing the bracket on which they turn, and the groove or niche they shut into when closed. C. the fangs magnified.

Colour plate facing page 277 of 'White-Jointed Spider'



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