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  ― 197 ―

Range.

“Grows on hard clay soil, often stony, and always some distance from water. Generally in clumps and often in company of Gidgee and Brigalow in the Charters Towers district.” (Miss Zara Clark.)

Reid River, a few miles south of Townsville (N. Daley).

“The principal timber of the Emerald district, noted for its hardness and size, and for the good quality of its timber. Apparently local from Gin Gin to within 10–12 miles east of Alpha.” (J. L. Boorman.)

Some poor fruits collected by O'Shanesy from the Dawson and Mackenzie Rivers, labelled E. leptophleba by Mueller, are the present species. These were referred to by me in the present work, X, 333, where I doubted the naming of the specimen. It might be neglected altogether but for the reason that (op. cit., p. 333), it evidently formed the basis of the name E. leptophleba attached by O'Shanesy to a Blackbutt whose timber and bark he describes. He says “dispersed through the scrubby country westward from Goganjo.”

E. Cambageana, the Blackbutt of the Comet River and Coowarra districts, was first noticed between Jericho and Beta, thence onwards at intervals to Gogango, often growing with Acacia harpophylla (Brigalow).” (R. H. Cambage in Journ. Roy. Soc. N.S.W., xlix, 445, 1915.)

It is therefore widely diffused in the warmer parts of Queensland, but we do not know its precise range yet.

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