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(a.) Soil.

THERE IS a consensus of opinion that wattles will grow on the poorest soil, and thus it is that land can be utilized in this industry when it can scarcely be put under any other cultivation, and where not even grass grows. At the same time, bark richer in tannic acid and maturing earlier, may be obtained from trees growing on richer soil.

“The bark obtained from trees growing on limestonenote formations is greatly inferior in tannin to that of trees grown on any other formation.”


  ― 3 ―
(Report of Wattle-bark Board, Melbourne, 1878.) This is the only observation of the kind with which I am acquainted, and more are required; nevertheless, I do not hesitate to recommend farmers to utilize any poor land they may have for wattle culture.

“Sandy soil is best, lying upon a clay subsoil.………… I do not think that taking a crop of wattles off land renders it useless for other crops; but I consider it an advantage rather than otherwise, from the deposit of leaves, which manures the land for other crops. There is nothing to prevent one crop of wattles following another immediately; you may take three or four off without interfering with the productiveness of the soil.” (J. E. Brown.)

In preparing the land, if it be virgin soil, unencumbered with scrub and of a light nature, breaking up of the surface, sowing the seeds, and harrowing is all that is necessary. If the land be covered with scrub or other vegetation these should be cut down, burnt, and the land prepared in the usual way.

It must not be understood that any careless kind of cultivation will do for wattles, although when once started, they will thrive with scarcely any attention, but like other crops, the better the system of cultivation adopted, the better the yield and therefore the greater the profit.

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