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(d.) Commerce in Wattle-Seed.

It goes without saying that in order to assist the development of wattle cultivation, it is necessary that there must be increased facilities in New South Wales for procuring seed. I have already alluded to the fact that it would be false economy to allow considerations of price to stand in the way


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of obtaining the best seed procurable, for the ordinary cultivator only requires a pound or two, and the outside cost will only be a few shillings. Is the success of a plantation, perhaps involving an interest of hundreds of pounds, to be jeopardized through haggling with a seedsman over a few paltry shillings?

At present of course our seedsmen must obtain their supply of Acacia pycnantha seed from South Australia, and the mollissima seed from, perhaps, Tasmania and Victoria (though not necessarily, as it flourishes in our own Colony), while the decurrens seed, of excellent quality, may be obtained from within our own territory. It will be to the interests of Sydney and other seedsmen to establish local agents willing to push wattle-seed in districts already found suitable, or supposed to be so, for any or all of the species recommended for cultivation; and I hope it is unnecessary to insist on the common-sense advice of noting approximately the localities from which seed is collected, in order to prevent it being sent to districts totally different in climatic conditions. The best wattles are found growing under a great variety of circumstances, so there is no necessity to handicap the cultivation by ignoring local conditions.

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