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  ― 115 ―

Ecce Homo!

CHRIST of the Grecian brow and gracious lily hands,
They bear his banner now through all earth's heathen lands.
Christ of the Grecian brow that never knew despair,
Or love or hope or that white wrath no craven soul may dare.
Christ of the hermit's cell and painter's brooding brain,
Who keeps o'er death and hell his eminent domain,
Yea, Christ, Messiah, Prince of David's royal stem,
Not Christ the Anarchist of old Jerusalem!
Not Christ the Anarchist with fearless heart of youth,
Who laid his manhood down to keep the gates of Truth!
Jesus the Carpenter, the Man of Galilee,
Who died for his faith's sake, nail-triced upon a tree!
He gave not dole by dole the life he scorned to keep,
Too fine, too brave a soul to stoop and part the heap.
He knew the ache of toil, of rest the healing balm,
And the kind touch of oil on his plane-blistered palm.
He knew and felt it good—the clean grain running true
In the sharp-scented wood as the keen blade sang through.
He drank from earth and sun and all glad things the food
That made his quick blood run, that made his manhood good.
Laughter and wine and song, a woman's love-lit eye,
All these he knew, he knew ere he went out to die—
To die for a nobler dream than men had dreamed as yet,
To lift a star to lead them far when his own star had set,
To wake a marching song with syllables of fire,
For the multitude that must find its rood on the hills of high desire.
Passion and agony—ah God! he felt them too,
Among his Syrian hills, beneath his Syrian blue.
Passion and agony—what sense of bitter loss
They know who hear with the heart's ear that cry upon the cross.



  ― 116 ―
Jesus the Carpenter, the Man of Galilee
Who died for his faith's sake, nail-triced upon a tree!
Who keep his faith to-day? All fearless souls and true
Who thrill to walk his splendid way some high adventure through,
Some high emprise of God, in courage and in faith,
Knowing his lonely feet have trod the same strange way to death!
Who keep his faith alway nor cry nor count the cost,
Shall win for some diviner day a kingdom that was lost—
The kingdom of the heart, which no man may remove,
Whose law, of their dim dreams a part, is wholly God— and Love!

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