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Fruit

— This tree bears an edible nut of excellent flavour, relished both by aborigines and Europeans. As it forms a nutritious article of food to the former, timbergetters are not allowed to fell these trees. It is well worth extensive cultivation, for the nuts are always eagerly bought. Is said to take seven years from the time the nuts are planted before the tree reaches maturity and bears fruit.




  ― 218 ―

E. André, in the Revue Horticole, speaks very highly of this ornamental and useful tree. He says:—

The ripe fruit, however, is more particularly interesting. Usually one of the two ovules is abortive, and the surviving one fills the whole of the interior of the shell with its white, firm, close-grained albumen, forming a kernel which is as crisp as that of a hazel nut, but has a higher aroma, and a finer flavour. We have gathered and eaten these nuts in the month of December. Macadamia ternifolia is a tree which should be cultivated, both from an ornamental and economic point of view. Even if it yielded no fruit, it would make a fine appearance in gardens in the south of France, where the specimens already planted have passed uninjured through winters as severe as that of 1890-91, but how greatly enhanced would be the interest and importance attaching to this species if we could look forward to the discovery of some feasible mode of inducing the trees to yield a regular supply of their pleasantly-flavoured nuts.
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