previous
next

Vernacular Name.

— "White or Common Pine." It is often named after a locality, thus — "Murrumbidgee or Lachlan Pine." Other names will be alluded to later on.

The "Mountain Cypress Pine " of Weddin, near Young, grows on hilly country, and as a rule is not of a very sound nature, having dry rot at the heart; used for saw-milling and fencing purposes. There is very little of this pine in the Grenfell district. — (District Forester A. 0sborne.) There is a variety here (Parkes) known as "Ridge Pine," which may be either figured or plain, but is so called because it grows on the sides of hills. Sawyers will not take it if they detect it, as in many cases, though. apparently sound at both ends, is pithy in the middle, and thus cuts up badly. Generally speaking, the best timber has a rather smooth bark. That with rough curly bark generally indicates a rough curly-grained timber. — (Forest Guard P. J. Holdsworth.)

Mr. Osborne's "Mountain Pine" is C. robusta. Mr. Holdsworth does not send specimens of his "Ridge Pine," but it would appear to include robusta, and also the Red or Black Pine (calcarata), and it is perhaps a name given to inferior timber of both kinds.

previous
next