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Timber.

— The name White Pine has been attached to this tree because of its glaucous foliage. Sometimes its timber is nearly destitute of figure. I have Mountain Pine " from the Acting Forester at Thackaringa, near Broken Hill, whose timber is of a rich colour, but small.

The white is the one most used for all building and fencing purposes. How it comes to be called "white" I cannot explain, as the sap-wood only is white, while the heart-wood is invariably in lighter or darker shades of red.—(Forester Kidston, Condobolin.)

The durable timber; Black Pine no good. — (A. Murphy, Murrumbidgerie, near Dubbo.)

The white, red, or yellow varieties, as far as I can gather, are of one species; the branchlets are light in colour of bark, also the fruit-cones as compared with the Black Pine. These three distinctions are made owing to the respective colours of the lines running through the timber, but no difference exists as to their durability in works. The white, red, and yellow varieties are in great demand throughout the Western district for house-building. It seems to dry quickly, and has some wonderful records for durability. For example, I have a reliable record of a White Pine post, 20 inches in diameter, put into the ground near Wellington, infested with white ants. It was removed after thirty years, and was quite sound except sap-wood, and of the consistency and colour of iron. It is a capital timber for house-building purposes, but is rarely used in Sydney owing to the expense of bringing it so far by rail. I failed to find a single instance recorded in the Western districts Where white ants attacked the timber after it


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was dry, and the majority of the houses, etc., around the towns of Dubbo and Wellington are built of this timber. It is also forwarded for upwards of 100 miles by rail for building purposes, and invariably gives satisfactory results as long as the black variety is not used. — (J. V. de Coque.) The pine timber is the most useful timber here for buildings, telegraph-posts, and posts for wire fencing, and is not so liable as other timber to the attack of white ants. It takes a good polish, and I have seen shop-counters made from the same. It is also much used for ceilings, and looks remarkably well, and remains sound under the ground for many years. —(Forester Payten, Corowa.) The White Pine is a valuable timber, and is used extensively for building, fencing, and telegraph-poles. It stands well in the ground, especially if the bark is left on the part that is put underneath the surface. For building purposes it is indispensable, and nearly all the wooden buildings in town and country are made from this wood. It keeps sound for a long time, but houses made of this timber will not bear moving, as it splits and breaks very easily while being taken to pieces, so they cannot be erected again with any degree of neatness. — (Forester Postlethwaite, Grenfell.) This is one of the most useful trees, used mainly for saw-milling and fencing purposes, and is of hardy growth. —(District Forester Osborne, Cootamundra.) This timber is very free from knots, and easily worked, and is considered by builders and carpenters as the best of our pine, and is used for all buildin 'g purposes. It takes a very fine polish, and is very handsome in the grain. This pine is proof against white ants. I have often seen them moving over it to attack other timber, and would not attempt to touch the pine.—(Forester Smith, Dubbo.)
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