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Timber.

— Not a highly figured Cypress pine timber; none of the coastal grown pines appear to have much figure. " Wood soft, not supposed to be, durable" (Sir William Macarthur, speaking of the Sydney district). Timber from the Dorrigo is of very little figure, nearly as plain as that of C. Macleayana, and but slightly aromatic. Backhouse (Narrative, p. 142) speaks of it as affording narrow-plank and small timber, which is useful in building, but not easy to work, being liable to splinter; it has an aromatic smell.

The Tasmanian timber (Oyster Bay Pine) is used for telegraph poles. The bark must always be stripped as soon as cut, otherwise insects get in and destroy the timber. The above notes I obtained at Oyster Bay.

Wood of little use, said to be obnoxious to bugs, from its resinous odour. — (F1. Tas.) Timber strong and durable, used for furniture, planks, weatherboards, battens, etc. — (Cat. Col. and Ind. Exh., 1886.)
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