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  ― 67 ―

Vernacular Names.

— Its aboriginal name is in very common use, and it is also known as "Red Ironbark" because of its timber, but the timbers of other Ironbarks (e g., siderophloia and crebra) are also red. For obvious reasons it is also called "Red-flowering Ironbark." Sometimes it is called "Black Ironbark," because of the darkness of its bark. A very common name is "Fat Cake," or "Fat-cake Ironbark," because of the pulverulent look of the bark, interspersed as it is with blackish kino grains, the general appearance reminding one of a burnt greasy cake.

The name "Mountain Ash," as applied to E. sideroxylon, has doubtless crept into the Flora Australiensis and other works on Oldfield's authority. Following is one of his labels, in his own handwriting:— Oldfield confused, as regards bark at least, Eucalyptus sideroxylon with the Mountain Ash (Eucalyptus Sieberiana), which in the south-east of New South Wales has bark like an Ironbark.

lronbark, or Black Mountain Ash of colonists; tree, 180 feet; bark persistent, brittle with dots of gum; bark, iron-grey, rough, with prominent ridges; wood very hard. Mountain Hut Range, near Eden, Twofold Bay. — (Herb. Barbey-Boissier.)

Oldfield added later, "Eucalyptus sideroxylon A.C.," with which determination I agree.

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