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Pavement Gardening.

In Europe the café system is very much in vogue. There people like to take their refreshments in the open air, on the pavement. The pavements are very wide, often wider than the roadway. The greater portion of the width is taken up by the marble-topped or other tables of the café, while pedestrians walk alone, a comparatively narrow strip immediately adjoining the roadway. The municipality makes considerable revenue through permits to café-keepers to thus encroach on what in English cities would be called foot-paths.

On the, pavement at the edge of the line of tables, or just, outside the premises where the pavement is narrow, plants in tubs or boxes are commonly employed, either to give shelter to customers, or to ornament the surroundings. The plants used necessarily vary with the locality. For example, in France the Oleander, Euonymus, tall Privets (Ligustrum) and Date Palms are commonly employed. In Hamburg I noticed Ivy on trellises, and Thuya.

The outdoor café system will be long in establishing itself in Sydney, partly because our citizens, as a rule, have not got into the way of drinking their "soft" and other drinks in view of passers-by, and mainly because the narrow pavements of Sydney have, never been designed to lend themselves to the fashion. But in this climate I think that the desire for outdoor life will bring facilities for its realisation in time.

London owes a good deal to the Metropolitan Public Gardens Association, of 83, Lancaster Gate, which supplied poplars and other trees and shrubs in large cubical boxes, painted green, to stand wherever space will admit of their being placed-in front of the Royal Exchange, for example.




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What I would like to emphasise is that there must be hundreds, aye, thousands, of places in the city of Sydney where neat boxes or tubs containing nice plants could be placed, and thus the city made a garden city, even in thoroughfares where it would be difficult, and perhaps impossible, to have trees along the foot-path.

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