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  ― 300 ―

Avenue Trees.

Trees for an avenue, or for a well defined part of it, should be of the same kind. Every celebrated avenue in the world, e.g., the Horse chestnut avenue of Bushey Park, near London, and the Cryptomeria Avenue of Nikko, Japan, are of one kind of tree. The mixed avenue is an abomination, ragged and irregular at the best. If the continuity of an avenue has to be broken, let it be at some well-defined break, such as the junction of an intersecting road, or where the road debouches on to a square.

If you take an expanse of any length in street planting it is difficult to secure uniform conditions above or below; that is one of the reasons why it is so hard to obtain precision in an avenue, which is one of its merits.

A level plain, with soil, drainage and other conditions uniform, is an ideal as high as we can get, but even then, in say a hundred planted trees some will be found to greatly exceed in vigour or be greatly inferior to the average, and, if this be observed only when the trees are fairly large, it is not easy to rectify matters.

Avenue planting requires careful judgment of a high order.

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