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  ― 57 ―

Timber.

— Wood very hard and close-grained; it has the reputation of being very durable underground like that of most Tea-trees. Thus it is used for posts, for corduroy-roads, and for standing in water and in damp places generally. It has been used for engraving, but with no marked success. An engraving in which this wood is used will be found at page 50, vol. v, of the Proc. Philosoph. Inst. of Victoria for 1859. It is a "wood-cut designed by Dr. Ludwig Becker, and engraved by Mr. Grosse, which proves to be fully equal to European boxwood for the purpose of wood engraving."

The wood varies in colour from a uniform drab to dark red, and some specimens have a very pretty grain, which looks well under polish. It is fairly easy to work, and dresses admirably. It resembles that of the better-known Turpentine (Syncarpia) somewhat. Two slabs of this wood in the Technological Museum, which had been seasoned over twenty-five years (having been exhibited at the London International Exhibition of 1862), had weights which correspond to 56 lb., 13 oz. and 60 lb. 12 oz. per cubic foot respectively. Specific gravity .983 (61 1/3 lb. per cubic foot). (Report Victorian Exhibition, 1861.)

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